Feminism: Not A Dirty Word

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“I’m not a feminist – I love men.”

Believe it or not, I overhear this phrase all the time – at the mall, at my favorite coffee shop, on television during interviews with young celebrities. It’s really hard for me to hear other women uttering that phrase. I can’t help but think, how are you not a feminist? How is being a feminist related to the love of men? And since when did feminism become a dirty word?

The word “feminist” didn’t enter my lexicon until later in life. I began at an all-girls high school, introverted, eager to please, and a little cocky. There, I found a community of women – teachers, administrators, and fellow students – who wanted to celebrate the accomplishments of all women. Once, I mouthed off to a male teacher; his punishment was to stick me in the corner, facing the wall. The Dean of Discipline pulled me out of class to reprimand me. She gave me detention (and rightfully so!), but her last words stuck with me for a long time: Don’t you ever let a man put you in the corner again.

Feminism means a lot of things to me. Feminism is having equal pay. Feminism is not being afraid to walk down the streets at night. Feminism is having my voice heard. But, ultimately, for me, feminism is having a group of women who support you – who will build you up instead of bringing you down. It’s a form of sisterhood that should unite us. Feminism does not mean tearing down men, in order to uplift women – it’s only evening the scales.

Though you may find varying definitions of feminism, here at Femmepharma, we believe that:

“Feminism is a philosophy that supports equality of the sexes. We should value our biological differences and take pride in promoting them. The reproductive organs we were born with dictate “sex,” which is not to be confused with “gender,” or sexual identity regardless of outward sexual differences. Discrimination on the basis of sex and gender is a violation of our inalienable rights.”

While the debate goes on, tell us what YOU believe. How has feminism helped you become the woman you are today?